Motorcycle Forums » Biker Chat

Harley Motor Types

    • 46 posts
    October 14, 2009 9:07 AM PDT
    I was trying to find a list of the years each of the Harley Davidson motor types were produced.  Checked the H-D website and couldn't find it.  Anyone know where to find this?
    • 5417 posts
    October 14, 2009 9:22 AM PDT
    Here you go Drake.  Here is a list of all the Harley engines, and their production periods.  Each of these motors had a couple of different variations during their production.

    Flathead: 1909-1936

    The Flathead was named because of the tell-tail flat vented tops that are recognizable at the top of each cylinder head. This is the famous motor that propelled the Harley-Davidson to victory after victory in the motorcycle races of the twenties.

    Knucklehead: 1936-1947

    On the eve of WW2, Harley-Davidson introduced an overhead-valve V-twin with knuckly looking valve covers. The new motor, affectionately named the "Knucklehead", performed well both for HD and for America in the difficult years to come.

    Panhead: 1948-1965

    WIth improvements to engine design, like hydraulic valve lifters that supplied oil through rocker arms, the Panhead hit the market in 1948. It was named for the pan-like valve covers replacing the knuckle covers.

    Shovelhead: 1966-1983

    By 1966 the Panhead underwent still more improvements. The most noticeable being the distinctive enclosed cylinder head in a sleek, slightly curved top. At a glance this looks unmistakably like a shovel with the pushrods tubes resembling the handle of a shovel, and the shovel itself.

    Evolution: 1983-1999

    In 1984 on the heels of a bold employee buyout of AMF, the motor company went public and introduced its now famous redesign of the V-twin. This radical new design utilized styled square blocks to house the valve train. This motor, revered as the Evolution engine is known amongst Harley enthusiasts as "the Blockhead".

    Twin Cam 88: 1999-2006

    With numerous American motorcycle manufacturers trying to surface and resurface, Harley-Davidson introduces its most revolutionary engine yet. The Twin Cam 88 gets its name from its two cams versus the single cam in all its ancestors. This motor also goes by the nickname "Fathead" for just exactly that, bigger heads. With this new engine design Harley-Davison puts one more notch in its insurance for success.

    Twin Cam 96: 2007 - Present

    With an increased demand for a more powerful engine, Harley increased the size of their famous twin cam engine from 88 ci to 96 ci.

    Twin Cam 103: 2011 - Present

    Harley increases the power again this time to 103 ci.  As of 2011 the 103 motor will be stock in all Harley Davidson Touring model motorcycles. The new 103 ci engine also includes an integrated Oil-Cooler.

    • Moderator
    • 16441 posts
    October 14, 2009 11:48 PM PDT
    Once again, nice piece Lucky...
    Have you seen the shirt?
    Flat head
    Knuckle Head
    Pan Head
    Block Head
    Gimme .....
  • November 4, 2009 12:03 PM PST
    Lucky wrote...
    Here you go Drake.  Here is a list of all the Harley engines, and their production periods.  Each of these motors had a couple of different variations during their production.

    Flathead: 1909-1936

    The Flathead was named because of the tell-tail flat vented tops that are recognizable at the top of each cylinder head. This is the famous motor that propelled the Harley-Davidson to victory after victory in the motorcycle races of the twenties.
    ALSO with this design they were a side valve style engine, made them completely unique!

    Knucklehead: 1936-1947

    On the eve of WW2, Harley-Davidson introduced an overhead-valve V-twin with knuckly looking valve covers. The new motor, affectionately named the "Knucklehead", performed well both for HD and for America in the difficult years to come.

    Panhead: 1948-1965

    WIth improvements to engine design, like hydraulic valve lifters that supplied oil through rocker arms, the Panhead hit the market in 1948. It was named for the pan-like valve covers replacing the knuckle covers.

    Shovelhead: 1966-1983

    By 1966 the Panhead underwent still more improvements. The most noticeable being the distinctive enclosed cylinder head in a sleek, slightly curved top. At a glance this looks unmistakably like a shovel with the pushrods tubes resembling the handle of a shovel, and the shovel itself.

    Evolution: 1983-1999

    In 1984 on the heels of a bold employee buyout of AMF, the motor company went public and introduced its now famous redesign of the V-twin. This radical new design utilized styled square blocks to house the valve train. This motor, revered as the Evolution engine is known amongst Harley enthusiasts as "the Blockhead".

    Twin Cam 88: 1999-2006

    With numerous American motorcycle manufacturers trying to surface and resurface, Harley-Davidson introduces its most revolutionary engine yet. The Twin Cam 88 gets its name from its two cams versus the single cam in all its ancestors. This motor also goes by the nickname "Fathead" for just exactly that, bigger heads. With this new engine design Harley-Davison puts one more notch in its insurance for success.

    Twin Cam 96: 2007 - Present

    With an increased demand for a more powerful engine, Harley increased the size of their famous twin cam engine from 88 ci to 96 ci.




     

    • 1 posts
    December 10, 2009 8:12 AM PST
    Just saw this...Very nice list. I am always getting asked, what was made when, I gonna print it out and put it on my shop wall. Thanks Lucky
    • 190 posts
    January 2, 2010 12:31 AM PST
    very informative well written. u should write for a mag...
    • 844 posts
    February 14, 2011 8:51 AM PST
    Never saw this post...good stuff!
    • 846 posts
    February 16, 2011 4:47 AM PST
    One more engine to add that is the debatable VRod or Revolution engine.

    Flathead: 1909-1936

    The Flathead was named because of the tell-tail flat vented tops that are recognizable at the top of each cylinder head. This is the famous motor that propelled the Harley-Davidson to victory after victory in the motorcycle races of the twenties.
    ALSO with this design they were a side valve style engine, made them completely unique!

    Knucklehead: 1936-1947

    On the eve of WW2, Harley-Davidson introduced an overhead-valve V-twin with knuckly looking valve covers. The new motor, affectionately named the "Knucklehead", performed well both for HD and for America in the difficult years to come.

    Panhead: 1948-1965

    WIth improvements to engine design, like hydraulic valve lifters that supplied oil through rocker arms, the Panhead hit the market in 1948. It was named for the pan-like valve covers replacing the knuckle covers.

    Shovelhead: 1966-1983

    By 1966 the Panhead underwent still more improvements. The most noticeable being the distinctive enclosed cylinder head in a sleek, slightly curved top. At a glance this looks unmistakably like a shovel with the pushrods tubes resembling the handle of a shovel, and the shovel itself.

    Evolution: 1983-1999

    In 1984 on the heels of a bold employee buyout of AMF, the motor company went public and introduced its now famous redesign of the V-twin. This radical new design utilized styled square blocks to house the valve train. This motor, revered as the Evolution engine is known amongst Harley enthusiasts as "the Blockhead".

    Twin Cam 88: 1999-2006

    With numerous American motorcycle manufacturers trying to surface and resurface, Harley-Davidson introduces its most revolutionary engine yet. The Twin Cam 88 gets its name from its two cams versus the single cam in all its ancestors. This motor also goes by the nickname "Fathead" for just exactly that, bigger heads. With this new engine design Harley-Davison puts one more notch in its insurance for success.

    Twin Cam 96: 2007 - Present

    With an increased demand for a more powerful engine, Harley increased the size of their famous twin cam engine from 88 ci to 96 ci.
     
    Revolution 2002-Present VRod
     
    The Revolution engine is based on the VR-1000 Superbike race program, developed by Harley-Davidson's Powertrain Engineering team and Porsche Engineering in Stuttgart, Germany. It is a liquid cooled, dual overhead cam, internally counterbalanced 60 degree V-twin engine with a displacement of 69 cubic inch (1130 cc), producing 115 hp at 8250 rpm at the crank, with a redline of 9000 rpm. It was introduced for the new V-Rod line in 2001 for the 2002 model year, starting with the single VRSCA (V-Twin Racing Street Custom) model.
    • 844 posts
    May 1, 2014 1:45 PM PDT
    Don't forget the new water cooled head motor on the Ultras
    • 285 posts
    May 6, 2014 9:03 PM PDT
    So the 04 and up Sportster has a new engine developed in 04 based on the Buell. Now how doe it fit in? Since the 1200 C and R have larger valves than the other Sportsters. Would they classify as 2 different motors or 1? The Sportster introduced in 1957 and still going strong had a different motor than any other Harley.
    • 22 posts
    June 5, 2019 7:46 AM PDT

    I don't believe my eyes so clear and descriptive information.......good stuff.